Category Archives: Blog

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How Will You Benefit From The Dallas Museum of Art’s No Admission Fee?

Great news!   The Dallas Museum of Art has announced on 11/27/12 that they are doing away with admission and membership fees on January 27th 2013. More here.  This is a fabulous development.  Why?

 

1. Convenience – Money is a serious consideration in doing anything and admission fees play a huge role in what people want to do and what they actually do.  There are now 2 museums in downtown Dallas, The DMA and The Crow Collection of Asian Art. Both are within easy walking distance of each other and both will be free.   They are top quality museums that allow you to spend hours in admiring both ancient and modern art.

 

2.  Opportunity – For many people, no fees mean a chance to go see forms of culture and history that they would not ordinarily get a chance to see.   More people walking through an exhibit mean a greater chance for donations and volunteers to the museum.  It also provides an opportunity for people to give donations according to what they can afford and get a feeling that they belong to a special organization.  This will stimulate the need for more exhibitions and even more art.  When that art exhibition is photography, it means more demand for photographs.

 

3.  Exposure–  What photographer doesn’t like excellent exposure? The lack of admission and membership fees is good for new converts to the modern art world.  This includes people seeing photography as an art.  I find it likely, as photography becomes more and more accepted as an art form, free admission will result in more viewers seeing more photos in a form recognized as fine art. Over time, more viewers lead to more patrons and patrons mean more business.  This encourages a greater understanding and acceptance of photography as a fine art.

 

This is a win-win situation for everyone involved.  Museums get more members and donations, more people see and get education in the arts, and more people get to see photography as a fine art form that leads to business opportunities for all photographers. It’s a good day for photographic art.

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5 Issues Decorating with Light and Fine Art

If the light source of a room is from windows or a skylight, your decorating design will need to be different from a dark hallway or windowless room. Lighting is the lifeblood of any art.  Why?  Color.

Different  levels and types of light can influence the color of a displayed picture.  What does the room look like during the daytime hours?   Are you positioning your artwork to take advantage of the light sources or colors that attract the eye?  The pictures above are of the same piece of plastic under a different type of lighting to give you a sense of how dramatic the change in color is.  Use this to your advantage when placing your art.

The 5 Issues :

1. Non-direct natural light is best.  If the light source is from a series of windows, diffuse any excess light with window dressings like shears or draperies.

2. Avoid direct sunlight.   It will wash out all colors and eventually ruin photographs and other fine arts.

3. Avoid fluorescents when possible.  These give off  harsh light and gives things a different color tint.  Further, many people report having migraines if subjected to fluorescents for an extended length of time.

4.  Be careful with halogen spotlights.  Not only are they bright but also halogens spotlights are known to give off heat.   They are useable, but keep them away from any fabrics, drapes, or photographs.

5.  Be careful with soft white or yellow colors.  Yellow lights are, well, yellow.  They offer a wonderful mellow warming effect against cool colors like blue.  However, too much yellow will change the color.

All lights have their uses.   It is impossible to say that you should use only this type or that type of light every time.  Determining the effect that you want the lighting to have in a room before hand will aid you in choosing the types of lighting that will go best for your situation.

Does Your Art Have Heft?

Here is a post brought to us by Michael Zhang of Petapixel.  http://tinyurl.com/cxcutk6 about a review of photographic art by Andrew Graham-Dixon of The Telegraph in London.

It’s a great post, and the article in The Telegraph http://tinyurl.com/corwqco is worth a read also. However, I do not think that Mr. Dixon is a big fan of photography. He is too busy lifting the weight, heft, of his bias towards only one form of art. The quote in the article is:

“The truth is that very few photographers have ever produced images with the weight of thought and feeling found in the greatest paintings. The camera is certainly an artistic tool, and photos can certainly be works of art. But can they be works of art of the same order as paintings? Modern critical orthodoxy would say yes. But the real answer is no. Photography lacks the depth and heft, the thinking sense of touch, that painting possesses.

That is why the greatest images of the last 150 years– the images people argue about, contest, return to again and again – are not photographs but paintings”

This made me wonder what would happen if we started to look at other forms of fine art from the same hefty reference point.

“The truth is that very few sculptors have ever produced works with the weight of thought and feeling found in the greatest paintings. Clay for bronze casting is certainly an artistic tool, and sculptures can certainly be works of art. But can they be works of art of the same order as paintings? Modern critical orthodoxy would say yes. But the real answer is no. Sculpture lacks the depth and heft, the thinking sense of touch, that painting possesses.

That is why the greatest art of the last 150 years– the art people argue about, contest, return to again and again – are not sculptures but paintings.”

Nope, still sounds rather hefty.  I wonder how he would define a class of preschool finger painting?
Why not start your own artistic journey ?  Sign up to be a friend of A&A Photographic Arts today!

Do You Only Make One Print?

 

I came across this post on the Fashion Copious blog.  The author of the post claims that the reason photography has a hard time being considered a fine art is due to making multiple copies of our photographs.

I more and more believe that photographers who want to be taken seriously as fine artists should only produce a single production of a photo. The same way a painter only paints a single one off. This idea of producing multiple copies in editions is utter…” “ and the reason why art photography is perceived inferior to painting, sculpture, etc… Artist’s Proof is another marketing joke in the life of a photographer. No guts, no glory.”-   http://goo.gl/ctXTA .

Is it true?    Naturally, I have my own ideas.  But I’d like to hear from both the fellow photographers and the people who buy and collect art.

 

Would photography be more respected as an art if photographers only allowed one print of their work made?

 

 

Travel Security: 5 Tips For Safe Travel

 

Security of yourself and your camera is very important when traveling.  No one likes to have a job assignment or vacation ruined because of a thief.  Here are 5 steps that might help the next time your out-of-town.

 

1.  You are not going to blend in.  Don’t try to fit in but don’t try to stand out either.  The locals already know you don’t belong, but you should not aggravate that situation. The only place a person with expensive cameras and big telephoto lenses blend in is a sporting event.  If you find that you need to travel to a less than savory area of a city or country, hire a local guide or a local photographer as your second shooter or security. Do not go alone.  The locals will know where it is safe to visit.

 

2.  Hotels are vulnerable when the maid is cleaning your room.  It’s usually not the maid or hotel staff you have to worry about.  A well dressed person can simply walk into your hotel room while the maid is there and claim they forgot something.  Wham!  You just got robbed.  Use the hotel vault or use the safe in your room to protect things. You could also lock your bags with a chain around a bedpost or the dresser.

 

3.  Make sure to zip your bags closed.  The easiest way to do this is just to lock you bags with a small travel lock.  When walking around with a backpack, this can prevent pickpockets from accessing your things easily.

 

4.  When you’re in the local environment the type of bag you use for your equipment is important.  A major rule is less is more.  Remember you are a photographing “tourist”, not a pack llama.  Several photographers use hunting or fishing vests that have several deep pockets and carry things like UV lenses and cleaners.  Backpacks are great but you have to take them off to get anything.  A sling bag worn across the body is better. It’s easy to carry the bag in front of you if you need access to the bag.

 

5.  Remember that no camera or personal equipment is ever worth your life.  Equipment is replaceable, hopefully you aren’t.  That is what insurance companies are for.  Get insurance, either a travel policy or a separate business policy.  If you are traveling internationally, keep a list of phone numbers for your countries embassy or consulate in case something happens.  If something bad happens, speaking to a person who speaks your language fluently will make all the difference in what happens next.

Most of all, just use common sense.  Real life is not a scripted reality TV show.  Respect the laws, customs, and any police or security officers with large automatic weapons. Be safe.

Why not start your own artistic journey ?  Sign up to be a friend of A&A Photographic Arts today!