Tag Archives: art pictures

What is The Potential of A Photograph?

Some artists start their creative process by looking at a blank canvas. They envision the scene they wish to portray and think on what colors or tools they will need. They may begin with a sketch and some painters even begin with a photograph.

It’s a personal inner vision that tells them what the next step to creating their art is and what they need to do.  Then they use their experience as an artist to tell them how to accomplish it. It really is no different for the photographic artist. As you would expect, it begins with a photograph.

No, wait, it begins even before that. For me, it begins with my camera. I will walk down seemingly endless amounts of garden path and corridors looking for anything that strikes my eye. I look for things that are different, full of color, or makes a statement in some way.  Then I have to ask myself about the angle of the subject, the lighting conditions, and even what settings I might need on my camera. Soon after all that, I take the shot.

Once I have these various tasks done and I’ve finished my picture-taking for the day, I take my undeveloped artistic blueprints to my office.  There I start the mental and physical process of choosing what will work and what will not.

Cameras have limitations, and no camera will always manage the impossible feat of matching the human eye.  So, if I deem 3-10% of the number of pictures I take on a shoot as having some potential, then I’m happy.

I call those pictures a blueprint for that is the best description of what raw unformatted pictures are to a photographic artist. Those pictures are my canvas, or my sketch, and from them I ply my inner artist to create, simplify, expound, and develop my inner vision.

On a recent trip to Florida earlier this year, I found this palm tree flowering in a courtyard. The sun was shining and the sight of this strange flower sufficiently struck my curiosity.  I immediately saw potential with this flower.  This is the raw unfiltered image.

What is the potential?
What is the potential?

At this moment it’s just a picture.  Nothing has been done with it.  As a photographer I could sit here and ponder the exposure, the depth of field , and all of the photographic niceties that make a good picture and traditionalists usually do. But as an artist,  I’m looking beyond the technical at an image that can be transformed into a living work of art.

What kind of potential do you see for this photograph?

This week I’ll use it as my canvas and next week I’ll show you what I see.

Why not start your own artistic journey ?  Sign up to be a friend of A&A Photographic Arts today!

The Most Overlooked Fact About Doctor Waiting Rooms Revealed

I’m sitting in a medical waiting room looking at a boring picture/photograph from 1974. It’s a nice scene of a sailboat with a lighthouse probably from Lake Michigan or something.  But it’s seriously faded and has that generic waiting room look. Boring.

On the other wall is a dated and very faded watercolor print of something that I’m sure looked like a plant at some point.  I saw a similar print one time in some

gamene on Flickr - PCH trip (modified by Gazebo with lossless optimization, the addition of comment and XMP-cc:License and sRGB color space metadata, and the removal of JPEG APP13 (Photoshop) and JPEG APP2 (ICC profile) metadata)
gamene on Flickr – CC commons

cheap hotel somewhere on the Gulf Coast.  It was the kind of hotel where they paint the walls to give everything that tropical touristy look. I confess it didn’t make the scrambled powdered eggs and chewy waffles taste any better.

I’m almost desperate now for some form of visual satisfaction as I scan the room for anything, any visual comfort other than the fact that some guy is hacking up his lungs and I know at least I’m not that sick. So, what do my weary eyes rest upon?  Why, it’s a fake bronze picture of an Indian Elephant complete with trunk, tusks, and an awful old patina.   You know the kind.  You find them in every asian buffet or greasy spoon noodle shop.  I can’t help but wonder why?…

Now, I don’t expect my doctor to have the latest prints off the wall from the National Gallery. I need a great doctor, not an interior decorator. That being said, 70’s New England, 80’s tropical and some unknown asian noodle shop elephant patina thingy.  Really?  This is decor?  This waiting room is on life support hooked up to that mysterious machine going  Bing…Bing… Bing…

I get it, why should a doctor spend money on art?  Honestly, it’s a simple matter of holistic care. Good art makes people feel good. It shows confidence and style. Old out-of-place art on your waiting room wall doesn’t tell people you’re a traditional experienced doctor that’s been in business successfully so long the art has faded. No, it says, your outdated and tired.  If your art is still displaying the decaying remains of some glory year past, what is that going to say about your practice?

It’s time to update the waiting room Doc. The first step is painless. Just sign up to follow our latest blog updates.

The second is pick a theme that inspires.  Follow that theme by adding  artwork that match your taste and budget.  If you want a classical look then look to Black and White prints in a nice frame.  If you are looking for more color and a more modern edge, going to the metal or acrylic prints is a wise strategy.  Whatever suites your needs best.

With a little investment, you will make a boring and depressing patient waiting room into a vibrant classy room that inspires your patients, and subconsciously tells them their physician is on the cutting edge.

 

Why not start your own artistic journey ?  Sign up to be a friend of A&A Photographic Arts today!