Tag Archives: art prints

Using Filters to Create Art from a Simple Photograph.

This dramatic walkway through a dense palm forest looks as if it is a pencil sketch.   Much to the surprise of some, I did not use the pencil sketch filter in Photoshop to create it.   Instead,  this photograph is a result of high definition processing, black cherry colored red filters and the liberal addition of both abstraction blurriness and heavy vignettes.

This work started out as something different. Originally, I desired to take several photographs of palm trees. Walking through parks in the state of Florida one would almost naturally suspect that palm trees would be both abundant and easily photographed.   Realistically, only half that equation works out.

Finding palm tress in Florida is like finding a mosquito in a swamp.  They are everywhere. There are thousands of styles and varieties, yet to this day, I have found only a handful worthy of the effort involved in lifting camera to eye.   The difficulty is not their shape or size, no, rather their blandness. Palms are just not very colorful in their own right. You have either a dark brown with green foliage or a long trunk of sandy grey.

So, when I partook of the adventure to capture a cluster of palms for my next piece, I was ever the optimist hoping that today would be the day that I could capture that elusive photogenic palm.

Walk Among the Palms
Walk Among the Palms

The scene itself had all the particulars I look for.  It had the palms, of course, a nice sidewalk style walkway and plenty of atmosphere.   However, when started the process of selecting works for further enhancement, I was markedly disappointed by the original results.   It was too brown, too exposed, and the natural lines in the photograph created by the trees were all wrong, at least for me.   Still, I had that hidden impression that this shot was worth something. There was an unexplainable artistic feeling I had about it.

That is when my muse hit.   That magical feeling of “what if I do this over here?” started to guide my senses and my hands. I started attacking the problems with filters, until I found the hidden picture within the picture.  When you use filters in the production phase of your art work you invariably end up painting with light a great deal.  A nip here and a tuck there, along with darkening a particular tree while enhancing another gives you varied results until finally your mind settles on the answer you were looking for.

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Now This Is A Real Texas Longhorn

Most of the time when I take pictures of cattle, they show concern or, at the least, concern about my presence.  They look at intensively with their ears cocked forward wondering what I’m going to do next.  Not this Longhorn.  This darling of a Texas ranch really did not care about me at all.   That was an attitude I could really appreciate.

Of course who could blame him?  Weighing in at around 1200 pounds and standing 4 or 5 feet tall at the shoulder this big boy does what he wants when he wants.

That description doesn’t even include the huge rack of horns on his head. Those horns can reach lengths of 80 inches or close to 2 meters across. They are the signature item of this breed of cattle. The Texas longhorn is a true creature of beauty.

Longhorn
Longhorn

Once again I found a perfect use for the white vignette on the border of this work. It enhances the details of the steer and yet dramatizes the lush green grass around him. The trick to this work was getting the white of his hide to not be a pure white. There are touches of brown and black in his coat and I did not want to lose those shades.

I’ve seen longhorn with different markings and colorings before, but this is the first opportunity I enjoyed with one of these magnificent animals this close. The white and black in his hide and the brown nose come together to form indelible impressions of what Texas ranching is all about.

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The Most Overlooked Fact About Doctor Waiting Rooms Revealed

I’m sitting in a medical waiting room looking at a boring picture/photograph from 1974. It’s a nice scene of a sailboat with a lighthouse probably from Lake Michigan or something.  But it’s seriously faded and has that generic waiting room look. Boring.

On the other wall is a dated and very faded watercolor print of something that I’m sure looked like a plant at some point.  I saw a similar print one time in some

gamene on Flickr - PCH trip (modified by Gazebo with lossless optimization, the addition of comment and XMP-cc:License and sRGB color space metadata, and the removal of JPEG APP13 (Photoshop) and JPEG APP2 (ICC profile) metadata)
gamene on Flickr – CC commons

cheap hotel somewhere on the Gulf Coast.  It was the kind of hotel where they paint the walls to give everything that tropical touristy look. I confess it didn’t make the scrambled powdered eggs and chewy waffles taste any better.

I’m almost desperate now for some form of visual satisfaction as I scan the room for anything, any visual comfort other than the fact that some guy is hacking up his lungs and I know at least I’m not that sick. So, what do my weary eyes rest upon?  Why, it’s a fake bronze picture of an Indian Elephant complete with trunk, tusks, and an awful old patina.   You know the kind.  You find them in every asian buffet or greasy spoon noodle shop.  I can’t help but wonder why?…

Now, I don’t expect my doctor to have the latest prints off the wall from the National Gallery. I need a great doctor, not an interior decorator. That being said, 70’s New England, 80’s tropical and some unknown asian noodle shop elephant patina thingy.  Really?  This is decor?  This waiting room is on life support hooked up to that mysterious machine going  Bing…Bing… Bing…

I get it, why should a doctor spend money on art?  Honestly, it’s a simple matter of holistic care. Good art makes people feel good. It shows confidence and style. Old out-of-place art on your waiting room wall doesn’t tell people you’re a traditional experienced doctor that’s been in business successfully so long the art has faded. No, it says, your outdated and tired.  If your art is still displaying the decaying remains of some glory year past, what is that going to say about your practice?

It’s time to update the waiting room Doc. The first step is painless. Just sign up to follow our latest blog updates.

The second is pick a theme that inspires.  Follow that theme by adding  artwork that match your taste and budget.  If you want a classical look then look to Black and White prints in a nice frame.  If you are looking for more color and a more modern edge, going to the metal or acrylic prints is a wise strategy.  Whatever suites your needs best.

With a little investment, you will make a boring and depressing patient waiting room into a vibrant classy room that inspires your patients, and subconsciously tells them their physician is on the cutting edge.

 

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