Tag Archives: art

Do You Have A Dragonfly Yet?

Living in the tropics the amount of insects and other assorted creatures you find is just staggering.   Most of them are not very photogenic.   However, every once in a while you run into the sort of small insect that screams for a photograph.  A dragonfly remains one of the best examples I know.

Thus, I proudly introduce you to the latest in our dragonfly collection. Blue Dragonfly is a portrait capture of a male Pondhawk in all his beauty. That is unless your another insect, for these voracious hunters prey on smaller insects they capture with the their ability to fly at speeds of 30 mph or more.

Adding a little filter action to the scene produces the remarkable orange background. Funny enough, the background for this shot was actually orange. All the filter did was enhance a little more of this amazing color all the while bringing out the dramatic blue.

Blue Dragonfly
Blue Dragonfly

The hardest part of the filter process was the maintaining of those fragile wings.   A dragonfly’s wings have a very thin, almost completely translucent quality to them. Changing the filter to enhance certain colors would invariably end up transforming the unique properties of those special wings. Indeed it was a challenge that ended with some surprisingly pleasant results.

In the end, when this radiant blue dragonfly with it’s gossamer wings resting peacefully on a flower appeared before my camera I took the opportunity to snap it up.   An act I’m confident you’ll want to do too.

 

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The Artistry in Pine Cones and Lomography

Sometimes, I  follow a philosophy of “Don’t think, just shoot.” This type of photography is typical of an artistic type of photography known as Lomography.

Most of the time, using this philosophy gives me quite beautiful but very unusual, and in the end, for one reason or another, unusable shots.   However, I enjoy taking pictures this way.  Mainly due to the sheer artistic nature of the technique.

Taken through a specific type of Russian camera, Lomography is a film photograph.  Due to manufacturing standards in the Soviet Union,  blurs, light leaks, and other imperfections often occurred. Other significant indicators of this style are the use of high contrast cross processing.

Cross Processing:

Cross processing the practice of using incorrect chemical solutions to process film.  An artistic picture magically appears full of saturated colors and unnatural representations of color.

Pine Cones
Pine Cones

Pine Cones is an example of faux Lomography. I shoot and process my work in digital RAW.   When I add the techniques of cross processing and vignettes to the work, I’m working on a computer and not a dark room.

Just like a darkroom specialist applying the wrong solution on purpose, I’m applying the wrong digital filters.  The result is no one knows what will occur to an image.   Therefore, you may have to reprocess the picture several times to get the effect that you are looking for.

Or, as is more than likely the case, the picture does not make the final cut and ends up in the trashcan. It’s a laborious process , but one I think people can agree captures it’s subject in a way that no other type of photography can.

 

Exciting News from Florida

It’s great to announce that things are really moving forward for our gallery in Florida.   While A&A Photographic Arts has been a popular destination for the online art gallery aficionado, 3,450 social media followers alone can’t be wrong, and we have also spent the past year really expanding our place in the physical world.

Our Texas locations are still going strong.   We are still showing our works in both the Richardson and Addison Café Brazils located near North Dallas and we have plans to expand to other locations soon.

In March we announced our presence to the Florida art world by taking part in a month-long art show presented by Sun Gulf Art Gallery in New Port Richey.   We also recently became associated with the Tarpon Springs Art Association.   This organization is a very strong group of local artists who are forward thinking enough to see photographic art has as a new and upcoming fine art form.   We are always excited to be associated with organizations such as this.

Other real exciting news is our new expansion into Dunedin, Florida. The owners at Downtown Dunedin Deli & Grill have let us display and offer our art for purchase in the front of their restaurant. Dunedin is one of the prime locations around the Clearwater area for  fine art. There is a thriving artist community in the city and to present our art for the patrons of the popular downtown area is truly inspiring.

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Know Something Most Artists Don’t Know About Filters

This incredible capture of a local bird fishing by the side of a tranquil pond owes its drama and vision to the use of filters in photographic art.

What we do:

I’m often called upon to explain what a photographic artist does.  I explain not only to the everyday art lover, but often enough to painters and sculptors also. Many people, especially, other artists are often hung up with the use of photography as merely a recording tool for selfies.

Slowly, these barriers of misunderstanding are breaking down.  Especially as people see the results of science and art blended in perfect unison.

In Photographic art the light is our paintbrush and reality is our stretched canvas. However, we need to add some further explanation as our work of art Water Bird in Copper displays.

Water Bird in Copper
Water Bird in Copper

Namely, a filter is our artist palette.

 

This work has been released into the public domain by its author, Mlaoxve
Public domain by its author, Mlaoxve

Artist palettes are stereotypically large boards held by painters where they mix the colors of the paints. It’s one of the oldest and most recognizable pieces of equipment in a painter’s toolbox.

 

Painters use palettes to mix their colors to achieve the perfect nuance of color that they then apply to the picture that they are painting. It allows them to lighten or darken paints to create help them create the highlight or shadow in the work according to their need.

In photography, the use of filters is nothing new. In fact, with out the use of filters color film would never have developed. Filters allow certain wavelengths of light, or colors, through to the lens while blocking others.

In it’s artistic application; the humble filter can serve the role of the palette and dramatically enhance the drama and beauty of the picture at hand.

 

The 55 Buick Roadmaster And Why I Did It

One of the more enjoyable aspects of creating fine art out of historical antiques like this ’55 Buick Roadmaster is learning about the history behind them.  Usually, with machines like cars and airplanes, aficionados like Jay Leno, bring out their slide-rulers and talk about all the old technical terms.

You get to learn the Roadmaster had  a Variable Pitch Dynaflow Transmission, and how with a 322 Nailhead V8 you get 236 horsepower. Or, you could even learn why one of these beautiful cars would be worth more if it had wire spoke wheels than the standard issue. It’s like communicating in another language.

But let’s talk art.  When I originally went to take the picture, I thought of just a candid shot of the grill and hood to show off the natural beauty of a Roadmaster. But, I had another idea.

First, I must confess that after living in the Southern States for a couple of years the concept of watching NASCAR on the weekend is not lost on me.   I’ve always loved the angles from the live cameras on the cars. The shot from the bumper showing the other car following you from 12 inches at 150 mph always raises the level of excitement.

The distinguishing characteristic of this one angle is that the lines are never straight on the car behind you. Because the car is so close, and moving at speed, the dynamics of the shot will always show a slight curve or bend in the fenders and hood.   Your eye views this  as speed. Or, in other words, it makes it look like it’s going fast.

55 Buick Roadmaster
55 Buick Roadmaster

Normally, a photographer would reach for a fisheye shaped lens to accomplish this task. I had two problems with this idea. First, I wanted a slight curve, barely distinguishable to the eye. I wanted the subtle effect of speed without the obvious reason behind it. So I’d be understandably nervous about overdoing it with a fisheye.   Second, and most importantly, I didn’t have a fisheye lens with me, so I had to make do positioning myself, and twisting the camera just a fraction to get the effect I was looking for.

In the end, I believe the goal of what I accomplished the look I wanted. So, help me welcome the 55 Buick Roadmaster to our Gallery. Don’t wait; this work looks incredible on a metal print. Contact us and get yours today!