Tag Archives: car

You’ve Got To See This Classic Car.

This is the 1932 Chevrolet Confederate Roadster.  In early December, I had the pleasure of seeing this beautiful car parked in a local park.  The result is a classic car combined with the art of modern photography.

Built as the deluxe luxury model of the Confederate BA line in 1932, Chevrolet created only 8,552 of these fine cars.  A”Stovebolt Six” 194 cu. in. inline six-cylinder engine produced 455 hp thanks in part to an upgraded carburetor.   The top speed was a blazing 70 mph.  A special transmission featured easier shifting and a free wheeling mode rounded out the specs of the car.

The gas saving mode allowed the wheels to continue to spin when the driver released the fuel petal.  The unfortunate side effect of this economic idea was a lack of engine braking.

1932 Chevy Confederate Roadster
1932 Chevy Confederate Roadster

It also supported 4 wheel brakes, a rumble seat, and a set of “Town and Country” styled horns to let people know you where there.   One of the more fashionable signature features of this car was the use of louver doors and not vents on the side of the hood.

Oh, and one more fascinating historical trivia fact was that there are no turn signals. They hadn’t been introduced for use on cars yet.   However, a parking light and brake lights were available for purchase .

As for the photograph itself, I decided that such a classic car needed representation in the art world the same way it was in the 1930’s. I wanted a classic film look that was both black and white and approximated the tonal qualities of a 400 Kodak film popular in the 1930’s.

The burnt edges of the picture are also something that occurred in many examples of film from cameras readily available to the public. Whether these markings were intentional or the result of unfortunate film developing I couldn’t say.  In the end,  I wanted the look to closely mirror what your grandfather or great-grandfather saw when they looked at their photo books.

 

The 55 Buick Roadmaster And Why I Did It

One of the more enjoyable aspects of creating fine art out of historical antiques like this ’55 Buick Roadmaster is learning about the history behind them.  Usually, with machines like cars and airplanes, aficionados like Jay Leno, bring out their slide-rulers and talk about all the old technical terms.

You get to learn the Roadmaster had  a Variable Pitch Dynaflow Transmission, and how with a 322 Nailhead V8 you get 236 horsepower. Or, you could even learn why one of these beautiful cars would be worth more if it had wire spoke wheels than the standard issue. It’s like communicating in another language.

But let’s talk art.  When I originally went to take the picture, I thought of just a candid shot of the grill and hood to show off the natural beauty of a Roadmaster. But, I had another idea.

First, I must confess that after living in the Southern States for a couple of years the concept of watching NASCAR on the weekend is not lost on me.   I’ve always loved the angles from the live cameras on the cars. The shot from the bumper showing the other car following you from 12 inches at 150 mph always raises the level of excitement.

The distinguishing characteristic of this one angle is that the lines are never straight on the car behind you. Because the car is so close, and moving at speed, the dynamics of the shot will always show a slight curve or bend in the fenders and hood.   Your eye views this  as speed. Or, in other words, it makes it look like it’s going fast.

55 Buick Roadmaster
55 Buick Roadmaster

Normally, a photographer would reach for a fisheye shaped lens to accomplish this task. I had two problems with this idea. First, I wanted a slight curve, barely distinguishable to the eye. I wanted the subtle effect of speed without the obvious reason behind it. So I’d be understandably nervous about overdoing it with a fisheye.   Second, and most importantly, I didn’t have a fisheye lens with me, so I had to make do positioning myself, and twisting the camera just a fraction to get the effect I was looking for.

In the end, I believe the goal of what I accomplished the look I wanted. So, help me welcome the 55 Buick Roadmaster to our Gallery. Don’t wait; this work looks incredible on a metal print. Contact us and get yours today!