Tag Archives: colors

Know Something Most Artists Don’t Know About Filters

This incredible capture of a local bird fishing by the side of a tranquil pond owes its drama and vision to the use of filters in photographic art.

I’m often called upon to explain what a photographic artist does to not only the everyday art lover, but often enough to painters and sculptors also. Many people, especially, other artists are often hung up with the use of photography as merely a recording tool for selfies. Slowly, those barriers of understanding break down more and more as people see the artistic results of science and art blended in perfect unison.

One of my favorite explanations  is that in photographic art the light is our paintbrush and reality is our stretched canvas. However, we need to add another line to that explanation as our work of art Water Bird in Copper this time displays.

Water Bird in Copper
Water Bird in Copper

Namely, a filter is our artist palette.

 

This work has been released into the public domain by its author, Mlaoxve
Public domain by its author, Mlaoxve

Artist palettes are stereotypically envisioned as large boards held by painters where they mix the colors of the paints they are going to use. It’s one of the oldest and most recognizable pieces of equipment in a painter’s toolbox.

 

Painters use palettes to mix their colors to achieve the perfect nuance of color that they then apply to the picture that they are painting. It allows them to lighten or darken paints to create help them create the highlight or shadow in the work according to their artistic vision.

In photography, the use of filters is nothing new. In fact, with out the use of filters color film would never have developed. Filters allow certain wavelengths of light, or colors, through to the lens while blocking others.   This is often used to stop glare and boost picture clarity. Or, in it’s artistic application; the humble filter can serve the role of the palette and dramatically enhance the drama and beauty of the picture at hand.

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The Draw of Red Hibiscus

Visiting the tropical gardens of Florida are among one of my favorite places to go to. The endless carousing up and down long corridors of tropical greenery provides ample opportunity for a person to get back to nature.

Between one such corridor of tangled shrubs and brilliant flashes of floral thunder stood this exquisite hibiscus.   In full bloom this flower assaulted the air with both fragrance and a wonderful red hue.

Instantly,  the artist in me became delighted at capturing the image of this fragrant beauty. As pretty as this flower was, I still felt that perhaps it lacked something. Oh it was a stunning picture in its own right and processing it was a joy. But, I wasn’t happy with the total feel of the picture.

Red Hibiscus
Red Hibiscus

The color of the red flower on a deep-sea of leafy green sent an idea into my head. Why look at this botanical beauty through traditional black and white? So, I placed a deep red filter over the image and the results were magical.

The deep red punches through the various isolating influences of the green leaves and really pushes the actual flower to the limit of our visual acceptance. The petals of the red colored flower suddenly turn a red tinged highway of visible lines bursting forth from the center maw of the open flower.

The flower became a true apiary sign post inviting the delicate caresses of petals and pollen. A hidden beauty in it’s own right waiting for the right discovery.

The Making of “Peahen”

As an artist I love color, but as a photographer I am more inclined to rest with black and white images. There is one problem with this contradiction. What do I do as a photographic artist when faced with an image that belongs in color?

Birds are an excellent example of this issue. Some birds, like a mockingbird or a sparrow only really consist of browns and greys. While they are quite beautiful in their own right, yet as a flashing example of color they fall, for the lack of a better word, flat.

Therefore, black and white photography can help with those images by concentrating on the various non-color related details such as the texture of their feathers and the shapes of their bodies.

Peahen
Peahen

However, certain subjects such as a peahen artistically require color.   The various pigments and light reflecting qualities of their feathers just scream for a more color oriented focus than a simple black and white focus will deliver.

This carefully considered contrast between the elegant black and white and the strikingly beautiful color image of this peahen was forefront in my mind upon its creation. Therefore I rested with a colored technique that highlights the colorful aspects of the bird yet also maintains that certain elegance and style that a black and white photograph would produce.

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Expanded Printing Options

When it comes to printing your new work of art, the methods and styles of display are many.  Here are some facets of the way we like to see printing done through our gallery.

Prints

The use of a high quality paper-stock, canvas, colored inks, and wooden frames is a necessary need for printing your future photographic art. At the end of production the archival art prints and canvases are the stretched and framed by hand.

Extraordinary prints created using heavyweight 10 mil 255 gsm premium glossy photo paper with outstanding color saturation and the truest blacks possible on high quality photographic printers will add a sense of overwhelming quality and value to your art.

When it comes to framing, a 345 gsm semi-gloss fine Flash of Daisyart paper is perfect for the ideal high-resolution photographic imagery that causes your picture to truly magnify your status as a patron of the arts. Naturally, only paper that is acid, lignin, and OBA free is good for your art.

Canvas

All canvas prints makes use of textured matte style canvas that is 20.5 mil bright white. The canvas  a poly cotton blend and has no harsh additives or chemical agents. The perfect quality canvas to last a 100 years.

The solid wood frames receive a lamination coating in black, white, or dark brown.  Modern frames designed to make sure your art is clean and seen in it’s exotically glorious detail when finally paired with paired with the ultra-low glare Plexiglas.

Framed work also arrives with wire attachments for hanging and protective rubber bumpers. It even has a picture nail hook!

To take advantage of these special offers just press the I am a Crated Artist logo. I am a Crated artist.

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Setting Quiet: Use of Abstract Photography

 

Setting Quiet is a new piece that I created on a whim.  I’ve made abstract art using a camera before with some success.  Unfortunately, the colors and the focus are often unusable.

 

When a piece does work, it usually falls within the realm of a macro photographic form.  This transpires to where the subject is so closely focused and cropped it becomes abstract in its own right.

 

Consider that abstraction in photography is about presenting an image and having it engineered in such a way as to evoke a viewer’s response without necessarily being able to guess what the subject of the picture was.  Normally, having a close focus or a very narrow aperture accomplishes this using photographic equipment.

 

But that is just part of the story of Setting Quiet, I was curious about what would happen if we dared to open the rule book and go rogue.  So, I generated an image that hyper focuses the subject in the opposite than normal way.  The result is Setting Quiet.

 

In this particular photographic work of art, the colors inspire you to relax.  Relaxation and reflection are the mission behind this photographic work.  It identifies with that time of the day that inspires us to take a step back, ignore our stresses for the day, and experience now.  The blurred lines of the central circle alter your perception of light to dark hues while satisfying any need for recognizable form.

 

While we cherish the brightness of the whites and purples, we slowly descend into a realm of phantasmal blues and darker hues.  A relaxing commentary meant to nurture enjoyment of the day as we spend it.

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Discover other works in our collection at http://aa-photographic-arts.artistwebsites.com/index.html.