Tag Archives: feather

Do You Enjoy Seabirds?

While people in the northern hemisphere are celebrating the summer, we offer up our thanks to a

Ring-billed Gull
Ring-billed Gull

favorite destination during the season by visiting the beach. Sun, surf, and sand continue to be the well-known staples of a Floridian summer experience. Therefore, we would like to introduce the Summer Seabird Collection.   This new collection of seabirds from the sunny coast of Florida reminds us of those special days of warm sunny mornings searching for seashells and suntans.

The first addition to the collection was the premier work Two Pelicans is a principal component of our new

Two Pelicans
Two Pelicans

collection.  These two pelicans will swim confidently together from a local mangrove inlet into your personal collection.    Wildlife is found year round in the tropics but our new collection allows you to experience and share those special moments anytime and anywhere.

 

American Oystercatcher
American Oystercatcher

In another work, an American Oystercatcher looks on with steady bright-eyed intent. He is a captivating flash of color in a sea of black and white texture. This work was very difficult to accomplish, as these seabirds had little to no tolerance for any human getting a good shot of them. Further, they insisted on nesting among the seaweeds blending into the foreground and thus making a strange and uniquely textured shot.

Even the Royal Terns nap gracefully on the beach

Royal Terns
Royal Terns

knowing the beach is the place to be, well after a visit to our gallery of course!

In Other News

In other news this month, we’d like to introduce a new development in the history of the gallery. A&A Photographic Arts has entered an outlet vendor deal with a special art dealer. Fotos by Fritz of the Tampa Bay Area will now display and sell a specifically curated selection of photographic artworks. This kind of outlet market is perfect for our growing gallery. We now offer one of a kind artist proofs, cards, reprints, and smaller prints to a whole new group of art lovers.

 

Shop our Store

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Have You Ever Considered a Blue Jay Feather?

Have you ever considered a blue jay feather?   It is simply lying on the path when you stumble upon it.  It strikes you that this would make a good photograph. What do you do?   Most people pull out their point and shoot cameras or iPhones and snap an Instagram type shot and hope for the best.

 

Luckily, you’re not most people.  Your looking for impact.  Better yet, you want to see the scowl on your mother in-laws face because it’s good enough to hang on your wall type impact; and YOU took it.

 

The challenge in taking this photograph is three-fold:

 

  • You want to focus.  You want the feather in complete focus while allowing the background to also have a texture.   Texture is important. It adds a character to the picture and lets the viewer identify with it.  In this kind of shot texture is good.  On most DSLR type there is a P setting or a A-Dep.  Use them. Experiment. Most of all, focus on the feather.
  • It was important to maintain the contrast between the various blues of the feather and the blacks and browns of the ground.  You really want the picture to highlight the differences not only in color but also in texture. The lines that you see in the feather just simple straight black lines.  Yet, when you see them in the feather as a whole they are very striking and they give a delightful contrast to the texture of broken nuts and wood underneath it.  Contrast can help bring this out. Remember, texture is good. Contrast is good.
  • The lighting is tricky.  This feather is lying under a large canopy of trees.  It is a partly sunny day and that means that at anytime the sun will breakthrough introducing a slashing bright light across the mid-section of the feather. If you aim the camera into this specific area, the camera will try to compensate for the bright light and It would suddenly darken the shot for the picture and everything is black. If you choose the darker areas, then the shot would be vastly over exposed and the color gets washed out.  You have to try to get your timing just right.  Sure, you can always fix the picture in Photoshop or Lightroom later, but the idea is to try to do as little post-production as possible.

 

These are but three of the many steps you do when taking this shot of a blue jay feather.  But that’s just part of the story,  Little did you know when it happened, but you would soon be introduced to the previous owner of the feather.  There was a reason he had so recently shed it, That story and a picture on the next post.

Why not start your own artistic journey ?  Sign up to be a friend of A&A Photographic Arts today!