Tag Archives: fine art photographer

Understanding The Creative Experience in Photographic Art

Part of the creative experience when you are creating art of any kind is to understand when to break the rules. Studying the successful works of the masters before you earns you some of this knowledge; however, this alone does not guarantee success.

People that practice both photography and art like to have rules. But, rules are guidelines. More like suggestions to be contemplated. What makes a rule a steadfast guarantee of success in one photograph will make it an utter failure in another.

No, instead it’s really applying learned academic knowledge combined with the intangible gut feeling of pure instinct over the period of many viewings.   When you are looking at a subject, say a flower, if you purely concentrate on the academic aspects of taking the picture all you will accomplish is taking a clear focused picture.

 

That’s it, and that is harder than what most people realize in the days of iPhone photographers. That’s because the proper academic technique of taking a picture consists of the mathematical measurements of aperture, focus, rule of thirds, white balance and lens selections, the list goes on and on. You either get these right or it’s wrong.

 

The result is a properly formatted picture of a flower. It looks good. But is it art? That’s where so many people get hung up on definitions.

Now let’s look at that flower from a more creative view. When you are viewing the flower what are you trying to express? What vision are you giving your work? Do you want to break any rules to make that image speak the emotion or action you want it too.

Purple Daisy
Purple Daisy

How you come to this is by experimentation and learning what works for what goal you want to accomplish.   For instance, does the flower have to be precisely centered in the picture, or by putting it to one side can you force the viewer to move their attention?

After a while and about 10,000 pictures you begin to develop an eye for what is going to work and what might not. It is not really a conscious thing though.  I mean you don’t wake up one morning and the world suddenly looks different.  Rather, it is a slow process that usually takes years to appear.

However, I daresay you will become as proficient in the creative view of photographic art as the academic photographer does with all of their math and formula.

Mind you, neither side is necessarily better than the other and any photographer worth their lenses will tell you that it takes both the academic and creative approaches to truly the master the art and science of photography.

Why not start your own artistic journey ?  Sign up to be a friend of A&A Photographic Arts today!   

 

Get The Scoop on Our Easter Rabbit Before You’re Too Late

Around my humble place of residence are scores of unseen plants and animals living, or trying to, in complete harmony with the humans and their industrial machines. Flowers and trees, birds, rabbits, squirrels, skunks, even coyotes and hawks are found living wild in our urban areas.

It is very rare to see the larger animals but finding them are a challenge that I enjoy. Often, these animals learn to approach humans in a cautionary way. One such example is our friendly kitten (baby rabbit) featured above. He was not real sure about me and never stopped looking in my direction during our little visit.

In fact, a small ballet soon ensued of him moving a foot away, and me slowly following. We’d stop, eye each other, and then continue to move another foot. This went on for several minutes until I finally lost the little guy under some brush.  Unfortunately, this is only half the work.

Bunny
Bunny

The other half of producing a work of art is in its production.  While most of the time the choice of whether to use black or white for a picture or full color is an easy choice for the photographic artist, sometimes the shot forces a specific choice.

For example, our cute bunny presented all forms of difficulties for a color shot. The rabbit has earth brown fur and he is sitting upon a small pile of flattened medium brown tree mulch while enjoying the protection of some dark shade from the sun wafting through the trees above.  The result was a small cute rabbit no one could see.  Obviously, what is great for the rabbit vs. predators is not so wonderful for the photographer.

It’s these very limits on what the picture will look like in color that makes photographic art no different from many of the other arts. For instance, In sculptor the rock forces the sculptor to use the rock he is given  in a particular way to create his work. It’s the same for photography, while I can manipulate the image in a variety of forms and fashions; I’m forced to use the underlying picture as nature gave it to me. This is the creative challenge that I love about this art.

Why not start your own artistic journey ?  Sign up to be a friend of A&A Photographic Arts today!

 

The Most Overlooked Fact About Doctor Waiting Rooms Revealed

I’m sitting in a medical waiting room looking at a boring picture/photograph from 1974. It’s a nice scene of a sailboat with a lighthouse probably from Lake Michigan or something.  But it’s seriously faded and has that generic waiting room look. Boring.

On the other wall is a dated and very faded watercolor print of something that I’m sure looked like a plant at some point.  I saw a similar print one time in some

gamene on Flickr - PCH trip (modified by Gazebo with lossless optimization, the addition of comment and XMP-cc:License and sRGB color space metadata, and the removal of JPEG APP13 (Photoshop) and JPEG APP2 (ICC profile) metadata)
gamene on Flickr – CC commons

cheap hotel somewhere on the Gulf Coast.  It was the kind of hotel where they paint the walls to give everything that tropical touristy look. I confess it didn’t make the scrambled powdered eggs and chewy waffles taste any better.

I’m almost desperate now for some form of visual satisfaction as I scan the room for anything, any visual comfort other than the fact that some guy is hacking up his lungs and I know at least I’m not that sick. So, what do my weary eyes rest upon?  Why, it’s a fake bronze picture of an Indian Elephant complete with trunk, tusks, and an awful old patina.   You know the kind.  You find them in every asian buffet or greasy spoon noodle shop.  I can’t help but wonder why?…

Now, I don’t expect my doctor to have the latest prints off the wall from the National Gallery. I need a great doctor, not an interior decorator. That being said, 70’s New England, 80’s tropical and some unknown asian noodle shop elephant patina thingy.  Really?  This is decor?  This waiting room is on life support hooked up to that mysterious machine going  Bing…Bing… Bing…

I get it, why should a doctor spend money on art?  Honestly, it’s a simple matter of holistic care. Good art makes people feel good. It shows confidence and style. Old out-of-place art on your waiting room wall doesn’t tell people you’re a traditional experienced doctor that’s been in business successfully so long the art has faded. No, it says, your outdated and tired.  If your art is still displaying the decaying remains of some glory year past, what is that going to say about your practice?

It’s time to update the waiting room Doc. The first step is painless. Just sign up to follow our latest blog updates.

The second is pick a theme that inspires.  Follow that theme by adding  artwork that match your taste and budget.  If you want a classical look then look to Black and White prints in a nice frame.  If you are looking for more color and a more modern edge, going to the metal or acrylic prints is a wise strategy.  Whatever suites your needs best.

With a little investment, you will make a boring and depressing patient waiting room into a vibrant classy room that inspires your patients, and subconsciously tells them their physician is on the cutting edge.

 

Why not start your own artistic journey ?  Sign up to be a friend of A&A Photographic Arts today!