Tag Archives: fine art photographic prints

Now This Is A Real Texas Longhorn

Most of the time when I take pictures of cattle, they show concern or, at the least, concern about my presence.  They look at intensively with their ears cocked forward wondering what I’m going to do next.  Not this Longhorn.  This darling of a Texas ranch really did not care about me at all.   That was an attitude I could really appreciate.

Of course who could blame him?  Weighing in at around 1200 pounds and standing 4 or 5 feet tall at the shoulder this big boy does what he wants when he wants.

That description doesn’t even include the huge rack of horns on his head. Those horns can reach lengths of 80 inches or close to 2 meters across. They are the signature item of this breed of cattle. The Texas longhorn is a true creature of beauty.

Longhorn
Longhorn

Once again I found a perfect use for the white vignette on the border of this work. It enhances the details of the steer and yet dramatizes the lush green grass around him. The trick to this work was getting the white of his hide to not be a pure white. There are touches of brown and black in his coat and I did not want to lose those shades.

I’ve seen longhorn with different markings and colorings before, but this is the first opportunity I enjoyed with one of these magnificent animals this close. The white and black in his hide and the brown nose come together to form indelible impressions of what Texas ranching is all about.

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The Strange Case of The Striped Cow

Going out on a photo shoot takes time, concentration and, now and then, a bit of luck. The general idea is to carefully notice everything around me and look for potential angles and light displays that captivate my inner artist.  It could be the light of the early morning sun as it hits a bird in just the right way, or the shade of a palm tree protecting a flower from the harshest of the sun’s rays.

But, as hard as I try, sometimes I do not realize what I have captured until I get home and start intensively critiquing and processing my raw work. Such is the case with our new piece of art Striped Cow.   The pattern of stripes and color on her head and flanks was simply mesmerizing.

Striped Cow
Striped Cow

She turned her head in my direction giving me that classical bovine look of curiosity with ears propped up listening to see if I was a threat to her peace and quiet. In the field I noticed she turned her body slightly to get a better view of my approach.  She was only interested in what I was going to do. More than likely worried that I meant her or her herd possible harm.   I always find it humorous that cattle do not seem to think that the same fence that keeps them from harming you also keeps us from approaching and harming them.

In any case,  it wasn’t until the final stages of processing these pictures that my attention caught the unusual.   I was working on the edges to give it that classic overexposed vignette when I noticed the anomaly.

It appears out indelible friendly cow only has 3 legs.   It’s not true of course.   She had four legs when I took the shot, however, the angle of her far right front leg matches up perfectly with her left front leg.   Further adding to the illusion is the blackish striping she has at the top of her leg. It makes her shoulder appear to camouflage into the rest of her flank.

A strange illusion indeed and definitely not one that you see everyday.  Sometimes it is the hidden illusion in a picture that add that sense of wonder to a piece.  I believe this is such a case.

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Moon Goddess Coyolxauhqui

Peering from the darkness, the goddess Coyolxauhqui (coh-yohl-shau’-kee) is one of the most important deities in the world of the Aztecs.   She is the moon goddess with copper bells on her cheeks. She is also the sister of the sun-god Huitzilopochtli and 400 star deities in the night sky.   She is also the daughter of Coatlicue (coh-ah-tlee’-cooeh ) the Earth Goddess.

Her mother Coatlicue was busy sweeping her temple one fine day when a ball of feathers fell upon her bosom. Instantly she became pregnant. When Coyolxauhqui discovered this she became overcome with anger that her mother did not know who the father might be.  Further, she felt her family honor was forever tarnished. So, Coyolxauhqui decided to kill her mother with the help of her star brothers.

When she cornered her mother and was rushing in for the kill, her mother, Coatlicue, suddenly gave birth to Huitzilopochtli (wee-tsee-loh-poch’-tle) god of sun and the war-god.   He sprang forth from his mother fully armed and wearing battle armor. Using a fire serpent (sun ray) he killed his sister Coyolxauhqui and the 400 star brothers.

Moon Goddess Coyolxauhqui
Moon Goddess Coyolxauhqui

Standing over the dead body of the moon goddess, the sun-god cut off her limbs and finally her head. However, as Huitzilopochtli felt concern that his mother would miss her daughter he threw the head of Coyolxauhqui into the sky where she became the moon.   He then threw the dismembered body of the goddess down the temple.

As the moon, Coyolxauhqui dies every month (the new moon) and because she is missing her limbs she appears in section until her face shines full.   This myth also explains why the sun is found always chasing the moon everyday in the sky.

Also, it’s possible that the dismemberment ritual of sacrificial victims came from story. An Aztec human sacrifice entailed removing the heart of the victim, cutting off the head and limbs and throwing the body down the steps of the temple.   Supporting this thought, the tongue of the goddess is also shown as a sharp obsidian blade often used for this purpose.

In today’s Latino cultures Coyolxauhqui is experiencing a revival as a quasi-patron saint of the overt rebellious woman figure.   This view asserts that instead of seeing Huitzilopochtli as a hero saving his mother and defending himself from butchery, the story of Coyolxauhqui champions her rebelliously standing up to dominating society and perhaps a cautionary tale of what happens when you lose.

Politics and religious fervor aside, The Moon Goddess Coyolxauhqui makes a fabulous addition to our collection.

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“Deity of the Week.” : Coyolxauhqui. Web. 14 Apr. 2015. <http://deity-of-the-week.blogspot.com/2011/11/coyolxauhqui.html>.

“Coyolxauhqui.” Coyolxauhqui. Web. 14 Apr. 2015. <http://www.pantheon.org/articles/c/coyolxauhqui.html>.

 

Richardson Cafe Brazil Restaurant Elevates Meals with Gallery Art

Some days you just have to sound your own horn.   So when an exciting opportunity to view and acquire genuine gallery artworks at one of Richardson’s favorite restaurants happens, we just have to let you know.

Trumpets of Glory
Trumpets of Glory

A&A Photographic Arts has recently expanded our relationship with the Cafe Brazil restaurant on U.S. 75 in Richardson, TX.

The restaurant has recently acquired 8 different photographic works from A&A Photographic Arts. The pictures are now on display and share an eclectic view of the natural world around us. Works include Texas and New Mexico landscapes, and scenes from a local garden. All of the pieces are available to the public for purchase.

We have produced many of the pictures on pieces of

works on display
Iphone pic of recent works on display

aluminum that give the color and tone of the scene a chance to really stand out. The metal surface allows for the light to reflect and enhance the picture in a way that cannot be duplicated with canvas or traditional framing. This allows for crisp and bright colors in the image while maintaining the pure blacks and darker colors that denote exceptional quality.

The vision behind the recent works on display is to take the ordinary natural world people see around them and provide a channel for them to experience photography on a whole new level. Each picture produces a renewed sense of wonderment and awe of the everyday beauty we take for granted everyday.

Our goal is to provide quality art to the public by promoting the role of the photographic arts in the fine arts.  The recent expansion of our works into Richardson’s Cafe Brazil restaurant will provide patrons with the unique opportunity of acquiring fine photographic art while  enjoying a great meal.

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The Most Overlooked Fact About Doctor Waiting Rooms Revealed

I’m sitting in a medical waiting room looking at a boring picture/photograph from 1974. It’s a nice scene of a sailboat with a lighthouse probably from Lake Michigan or something.  But it’s seriously faded and has that generic waiting room look. Boring.

On the other wall is a dated and very faded watercolor print of something that I’m sure looked like a plant at some point.  I saw a similar print one time in some

gamene on Flickr - PCH trip (modified by Gazebo with lossless optimization, the addition of comment and XMP-cc:License and sRGB color space metadata, and the removal of JPEG APP13 (Photoshop) and JPEG APP2 (ICC profile) metadata)
gamene on Flickr – CC commons

cheap hotel somewhere on the Gulf Coast.  It was the kind of hotel where they paint the walls to give everything that tropical touristy look. I confess it didn’t make the scrambled powdered eggs and chewy waffles taste any better.

I’m almost desperate now for some form of visual satisfaction as I scan the room for anything, any visual comfort other than the fact that some guy is hacking up his lungs and I know at least I’m not that sick. So, what do my weary eyes rest upon?  Why, it’s a fake bronze picture of an Indian Elephant complete with trunk, tusks, and an awful old patina.   You know the kind.  You find them in every asian buffet or greasy spoon noodle shop.  I can’t help but wonder why?…

Now, I don’t expect my doctor to have the latest prints off the wall from the National Gallery. I need a great doctor, not an interior decorator. That being said, 70’s New England, 80’s tropical and some unknown asian noodle shop elephant patina thingy.  Really?  This is decor?  This waiting room is on life support hooked up to that mysterious machine going  Bing…Bing… Bing…

I get it, why should a doctor spend money on art?  Honestly, it’s a simple matter of holistic care. Good art makes people feel good. It shows confidence and style. Old out-of-place art on your waiting room wall doesn’t tell people you’re a traditional experienced doctor that’s been in business successfully so long the art has faded. No, it says, your outdated and tired.  If your art is still displaying the decaying remains of some glory year past, what is that going to say about your practice?

It’s time to update the waiting room Doc. The first step is painless. Just sign up to follow our latest blog updates.

The second is pick a theme that inspires.  Follow that theme by adding  artwork that match your taste and budget.  If you want a classical look then look to Black and White prints in a nice frame.  If you are looking for more color and a more modern edge, going to the metal or acrylic prints is a wise strategy.  Whatever suites your needs best.

With a little investment, you will make a boring and depressing patient waiting room into a vibrant classy room that inspires your patients, and subconsciously tells them their physician is on the cutting edge.

 

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