Tag Archives: metal

Which Print of Pelican Do Other Artists Say to Buy?

April is a very busy month in the art world.  There are a lot of public shows and a few private ones. For example, the work Pelican recently showed at an exclusive art show with the Tarpon Springs Art Association in Tarpon Springs, Florida. These private or member only art shows really test an artist’s nerve. It is like presenting a scientific paper at a medical symposium. There is no place to hide if something goes hideously wrong and your colleagues are going to scrutinize your work with every critical bone in their body.

The story behind Pelican is a rather simple one. I was sitting on a dock watching a local fisherman filet a large fish, a large friendly pelican suddenly showed up to see if any scraps accidentally fell in the water. It was like watching a family pet begging at the dinner table.  In the end it did not leave disappointed.

Pelican
Pelican

When I was in the process of choosing the type of print for the show, I discovered archival prints of this work look good. The work printed on canvas really has a classy artistic look.  But, nothing beats out the absolute beauty of Pelican printed on metal.   The gloss of the aluminum lends itself to showcase the pure whites in such a way that it looks almost self-illuminant. There is a serious wow factor to the print.

Pelican
Pelican

I soon found out I was no alone in this thought.  In fact, the biggest complaint or critique I had on presenting Pelican was a comment that the print on metal was actually too good for local fare. Other artists told me that if a patron has a white or black furniture theme in the home or office, then a metal print of Pelican is the print they should get.  It was the type of complaints that any artist wants to hear.

In Other News:

The gallery has experienced some very exciting growth opportunities recently by expanding its exhibitions

Monarch Butterfly 3
Monarch Butterfly 3

beyond the Texas border.   The newest members of the butterfly collection made a special appearance at the Tarpon Springs annual Art on the Bayou festival. White Peacock Butterfly 2 and Monarch Butterfly 3 was well received by both the public and other artists alike.

White Peacock Butterfly 2
White Peacock Butterfly 2

Future Happenings:

The gallery will exhibit local photographic works in a new two-person art show at the Susan Dillinger Art Gallery in the New Port Richey City Hall from May 2nd – May 31st.  The works will be on display during regular business hours.  There is no cost to attend and enjoy the art.  All art will be available for purchase.

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The 55 Buick Roadmaster And Why I Did It

One of the more enjoyable aspects of creating fine art out of historical antiques like this ’55 Buick Roadmaster is learning about the history behind them.  Usually, with machines like cars and airplanes, aficionados like Jay Leno, bring out their slide-rulers and talk about all the old technical terms.

You get to learn the Roadmaster had  a Variable Pitch Dynaflow Transmission, and how with a 322 Nailhead V8 you get 236 horsepower. Or, you could even learn why one of these beautiful cars would be worth more if it had wire spoke wheels than the standard issue. It’s like communicating in another language.

But let’s talk art.  When I originally went to take the picture, I thought of just a candid shot of the grill and hood to show off the natural beauty of a Roadmaster. But, I had another idea.

First, I must confess that after living in the Southern States for a couple of years the concept of watching NASCAR on the weekend is not lost on me.   I’ve always loved the angles from the live cameras on the cars. The shot from the bumper showing the other car following you from 12 inches at 150 mph always raises the level of excitement.

The distinguishing characteristic of this one angle is that the lines are never straight on the car behind you. Because the car is so close, and moving at speed, the dynamics of the shot will always show a slight curve or bend in the fenders and hood.   Your eye views this  as speed. Or, in other words, it makes it look like it’s going fast.

55 Buick Roadmaster
55 Buick Roadmaster

Normally, a photographer would reach for a fisheye shaped lens to accomplish this task. I had two problems with this idea. First, I wanted a slight curve, barely distinguishable to the eye. I wanted the subtle effect of speed without the obvious reason behind it. So I’d be understandably nervous about overdoing it with a fisheye.   Second, and most importantly, I didn’t have a fisheye lens with me, so I had to make do positioning myself, and twisting the camera just a fraction to get the effect I was looking for.

In the end, I believe the goal of what I accomplished the look I wanted. So, help me welcome the 55 Buick Roadmaster to our Gallery. Don’t wait; this work looks incredible on a metal print. Contact us and get yours today!

Mystery of the Metal Plate: Solved?

This unusual black and white work is of a United Laboratories plate.   Now, normally you can find this metal plate seal on all sorts of electronics, mechanical machinery, and computer products. But what makes this one special is that its attached to a late 1920’s visible gas pump.

The visible gas pump, invented in 1925, served the purpose of showing the customer clarity of the gasoline pumped into their car. Dirty gasoline was a problem, and if a customer had to pay  17-25 cents a gallon for their gas, they wanted the best. The hand pumped gas flowed into a clear cylinder at the top of the machine.  The attendant measured, and then deposited into the gas tank of the car.

IMG_1751

After a little research, I believe that this pump once was serving Shell brand gasoline. Unfortunately, there is no way of knowing this for sure.   It seems that Shell, Blue Sunoco, and Conoco gasoline companies used yellow stations and logos.   However, I have only been able to find references to Conoco and Shell stations in New Mexico during the 1920’s. Further, I have located pictures on Google of yellow colored tanks bearing the shell logo during this time period. But, I’ve not been able to find Conoco brand tanks or stations that weren’t green or red and white.

I even tried looking up the UL no. on the label but it seems that it is so old that UL does not have it archived on their internet database. So, unless this is a local brand from some long forgotten company, I’m fairly certain it was a Shell station pump.

Artistically speaking, I love the way the patina of rust and corrosion really highlight and bring forth the dimensions of the sign. As for the choice of color, it became obvious that a Black and white photograph showed much more dramatic variations in the paint and rust all the while highlighting the sign. When the picture was in color, the bright colors retracted from the piece and were unsightly.

In any case, this work is a result of history and art working together in harmony while showcasing the wondrous beauty of Black and White Photography.

 

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