Tag Archives: new

Be The First To Read What The Artist is Saying About This WWII Fighter

I became interested in military aviation in the fall of 1976 when I watched my father work on a large plastic model kit of the Chance Vought F4U Corsair. This WWII fighter plane excited me; everything from the strange cigar looking long fuselage to the gull wings gave the impression that this was a different kind of fighter.

Born in WWII, the Corsair fought in the Pacific theater against the Japanese Empire. This aircraft was a star performer in the hands of many a pilot. Thanks to Hollywood and actor Robert Conrad, no one was more famous for flying Corsairs than Col. Gregory “Pappy” Boyington. He was a Medal of Honor winner and commander of the VMF-214 squadron known as the “Black Sheep Squadron”.

When I eyed this beautiful still operational museum piece at an airport after a nearby airshow, I remembered the old legend of the Black Sheep Squadron and promptly went about capturing the idea.   Baa Baa Baa was born. The conditions for the picture were not to my advantage, however.

Baa Baa Baa
Baa Baa Baa

In artistic photography light is your paint, reality your canvas, and the camera your paintbrush. All three parts must combine and work together for a work of art to coalesce. The aircraft hangers in the background coupled with another fighter just out of the frame proved to be a challenge thanks to the glaring afternoon sun. The only thing to try was constant repositioning and checking the angles for the shot that obtained the most dramatic effect.

Later during processing, I decided to try my hand at creating a more historical looking piece. The traditional black and white imagery proved to be too bland and the way the brilliant sunlight plays on the undercarriage shadows and shiny metal wings became muted. So I started experimenting with the pale browns and yellows of yesteryear type film. The result is a unique blending of techniques and filters allowing the picture to retain its historical feel and yet have the punch and crispness of modern-day photography.

Why not start your own artistic journey ?  Sign up to be a friend of A&A Photographic Arts today!

[shopify embed_type=”product” shop=”a-a-photographic-arts.myshopify.com” product_handle=”baa-baa-baa” show=”all”][shopify embed_type=”product” shop=”a-a-photographic-arts.myshopify.com” product_handle=”baa-baa-baa-canvas-print” show=”all”]

Are You Missing Out?

Did you know that today I sent out a pre-release email of our next hit work of art just in time for Christmas?   No?

Well, that’s because our Friends can see our newest works of art, when they are not released to the public yet.

Here is a hint.  –  It presents the primordial dance between sterile whites, subtle grays and powerful blacks. There is no greater duality than that of untainted black against the pure white.  Curious?

Our holiday orders are up 200% over last year, that means that our Friends have the best chance of ordering that perfect gift. Why let them have all the glory?   You can become a Friend also.  It’s easy and we don’t spam or sell your information.

 

Be a Friend of A&A Photographic Arts!

* indicates required



Email Format


How Will You Scare Your Enemies this Chinese New Year?

Happy New Year!

恭禧发财  ( Gong Xi Fa Cài)  or (Gong Hey Fat Choy)

Since it is Chinese New year, I thought it proper to introduce one of my new works. This is Male Foo Lion.  Sometimes referred to as a foo dog, foo dogs are really lions. Foo Lions are very important symbols in Chinese culture and references to them are easy to find. The most famous being sets of Foo Lions from the Ming and Qing dynasties found in the Forbidden Palace in the center of Beijing, China.

I wanted to bring forth and center upon the emotion in the statue by giving a close-cropped view of the Male Foo Lionterrifying teeth and eyes of the lion. I envisioned the lion launching out of the frame at the viewer with its ferocious intent. The image was desaturated of color and various dodge and burn techniques are then applied along with a cool blue filter to enhance the whites and boost the blacks in the image.

Traditionally, Foo Lions offer protection from negative energy or Qi. It does this in the same way gargoyles work. The scarier or more grotesque the figure is the better.   This frightening visage protects its owner by scaring away the negative energy. It’s also important to place the Foo lion so that it is facing a door or window from which the owner of the lion believes negative energy may come.

The male lion usually has a ball under his paw representing the world and is always located towards the left side of an opening looking out. The female lion is found with a cub under its paw representing support. The female lion is always located towards the right side of the opening looking out.

This particular image is that of the male lion. So, if you wish to feel the full effects of its protection, place it on the left side of an entrance hallway, door, or window.

 

Why not start your own artistic journey ?  Sign up to be a friend of A&A Photographic Arts today!

 

The Unexplained Mystery of Buddha Hair

Seated upon a stone bench in the corner of an ivy garden, this Buddha meditates with calm reflection of the peaceful and beautiful scene around him. It is very popular to position Buddha statues in gardens. They serve to remind the casual garden wanderer that the garden is a perfect place for personal reflection.

The Buddha statues you see in a garden are often varied in size, color and origin. The Buddha’s teachings traveled all over India and into China. From China it moved wherever the traveling missionaries/monks went.   Some took the teachings into the countries of the Southeast Asian peninsula, while others went through the Korean kingdoms into the Japanese Isles.

Thus, we find all sorts of versions of Buddha statues. Some are fat, some thin, some happy, some sleeping, and some wearing strange ornamentation on their heads. The key is that no one has any idea what the actual Buddha looked like.   We often forget in our technologically dependent civilization, that cameras and photography are not even 200 old years.   So, these statues are decent representations of people whom received the rank of enlightenment known as a Buddha.

This particular Buddha has the characteristic snail Buddha Statue in Gardenknots on his head. It is lost to history and speculation about what, if anything, the strange bumps actually represent. Historians know that the Buddha shaved his head after he became enlightened. According to a logical earthly artistic interpretation, the bumps therefore show the artists were artistically attempting to display the short curls of the Buddha as the hair grew back in.

However, since the Buddha is often seen in a spiritual nature, it makes sense that there is a story that covers this characteristic also. Indeed, there is a popular story of garden snails who martyr themselves to the sun while protecting Buddha’s shaved head from sunburn as he meditated in the garden one day.

It was also thought that upon enlightenment you would receive a cranial bump that signified your advancement into higher levels of thinking. One possible interpretation being that bigger thinking needs bigger brains that have bigger skulls. Therefore, the Buddha could have all these bumps to signify how spiritually advanced he was.

Regardless of your interpretation, the Buddha statue remains one of the focal points to most gardens. A simple reminder that harmony and peace should exist there.

Why not start your own artistic journey ?  Sign up to be a friend of A&A Photographic Arts today!

What Are Your 6 Resolutions For 2013?

The New Years holiday is one of the most challenging holidays for photographers.  Some photographers will work tonight, others, like myself, will spend the last waning hours of 2012 opening a bottle of Asti Spumante and celebrating quietly in the peaceful bliss of my living room. While sipping the Asti, I’ll be thinking about last year, this year, and the year to come.  It’s the most dangerous time of the evening when people start thinking about their New Year resolutions.

New year resolutions are like promises that you make to yourself. Oh, there is the typical promise to exercise or to lose weight.  But let’s be real here.  Those will probably last a few weeks and then be forgotten.  It’s the small resolutions that count.  Here are some examples.

  • I want to use the equipment I have on hand to make better pictures.  I would love to buy a new macro lens and a wide-angle lens this year.  Realistically, I’ll be fortunate to buy a lens cap.  So, I need to use the equipment I have to the most effect.

 

  • I want to ask one of my friends to take a portrait of me.  I need a new picture for social media and other functional things.  This one is hard for me.  I’ve always liked taking pictures because I’m the one behind the camera and not in front of it.  I’m not camera-shy, I just don’t like my picture being taken.  Kind of weird isn’t it?

 

  • I want to go someplace new this year, like Savannah, Georgia or Yosemite National Park.  Adventure!  Excitement!  Alaska!  Of course, there is always Bora-Bora and Italy.  Hey, if you’re going to dream, dream big! I’ll have to see what my lens cap budget says.

 

  • I want to spend more time with other photographers.  I have a friend that shoots weddings and fine art.  He has invited me to go get coffee and just talk.  I’m going to take him up on the offer.  I also want to meet other photographers and start talking more.   I have a lot to learn about photography and a book will only get you so far.

 

  • I want to take advantage of opportunities as they become available.  People do not take advantage of the opportunities that are given to them.  Most of the time it’s because our thoughts are “in the clouds” and not concentrating on what is important at that moment.   I want to become more aware of those personal and business opportunities so that I can use them for others and mine benefits.

 

  • I want to spend more time with my wife. This one is the most important resolution. This New Year will mark 20 years of aggravation and financial uncertainty that marriage can bring.  It also marks my magic 5th year of being a cancer survivor.  All of which my wife has been there for and supported me during all of it and I am the better for it.

 

I’m interested in what your resolutions are.  How are you going to help yourself or others become not only better photographers but better people?  Comment below!

Why not start your own artistic journey ?  Sign up to be a friend of A&A Photographic Arts today!