Tag Archives: purple

This Purple Orchid Fails and Why That’s OK!

Purple Orchid‘s sensuality cannot be understated.  Orchids are by far one of the most emotionally appealing flowers.  The colors are bright and pure and the fragrance is exquisite.

In the work Purple Orchid, the color of purple, as it’s namesake suggests, saturates the picture with a unique and glorious purple hue.  The ranges of purple color immediately draws your eye to the orchid itself in it’s impressive clarity.

But, in so doing your attention distracted by the slightly out of focus green leaf of the plant.  The leaf is blocking and even attempting to hide the view of this developed flower.

The nature in which the leaf attempts to hide the flower suggests a comparison with the our culture’s social outcry of protecting our flowers of youth from the cold arduous world.

The use of a flower as representation of youth and children is not a new concept, however the picture suggests that even though the orchid plant is making every conceivable effort to shelter its delicate blossom.

It is worth noting that the plant fails at the attempt.  In fact, the plant only succeeds in drawing Purple Orchidour attention to the rarity and fragile nature of the blossom.

This need to nurture or protect the bloom of our youth seems most natural to us.  Something so rare and beautiful must surely be protected.  But the imagery in this tranquil scene portrays a delicate situation.  Like the plant depending on this delicate flower, people depend on our children to pass on our traditions and culture.

Both the orchid and our children need precise care, and yet sheltering them adversity, from the insects and wind of the garden, does as much harm as good.  For without the adversity the blossom will never carry out the next step in its life cycle.  What then is the balance?

The flower, like childhood, only lasts so long until nature itself decides to solve the challenge, and we either succeeded or failed at our endeavor.

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Palm Trees at Dusk: Who Else Wants To Be Here?

There are few places that suggests paradise quite like an evening at the beach.  Palm Trees at Dusk attempts to capture that special moment when the sun has set low enough in the horizon to place everything in a permanent shadow.

But what makes this photographic grab our attention is the beautiful contrast of the dark black of the trees against the softer purples and peach colors of the setting sun.  The small wisps of purple clouds add a sense of mystery and beckoning to the story.

Imagine sitting in your beach chair sipping on the last Palm Trees at Duskbit of your after dinner drinks staring at this scene in surreal calm.  You might think of the gourmet feast of your favorite tropical fish, crabs, and fruit you just consumed and adjust your sitting position to accommodate your full stomach.

Who doesn’t enjoy sitting there on the beach listening to the serene sounds of the pounding ocean waves and the lasting cries of the seagulls as they start to land for the evening?

Looking up into the grove of palm trees swaying in the gentle warm tropical evening breeze you realize that this may just be heaven on earth.  A person could so get used to this break from the hustle and time demanding issues of modern life in the city.

I think maybe, just maybe, that self-employed treasure hunter patrolling the beaches in the morning and fishing in the afternoon may just have the best job in the world.  Where, I wonder, could you get an application for that job?

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What a Cute Ball of Urchin Spines?!?

Spines of Urchin is a photograph of the intimidating sea urchin.   These brainless animals crawl slowly upon the ocean floor looking for food.  No, I’m not being cruel to these cute balls of spines.   They really have no brains.   They also do not have ears, or eyes and their mouth is on the bottom.

 

Spines of Urchin
The flat disk on the spines are feet!

These unique creatures roam the seabed looking for algae or kelp to munch on using light-sensitive cells in their spines. At first glance, you might not see how these amazing creatures travel up sheer rock walls or even the sides of holding tanks.  The secret is in their spines.  If you look at Spines of Urchin closely you’ll see that some of the spines end in points, and some end in a flat suction like disc.   These discs are their feet.  They not only use the feet for travel and suction but also to pick up pieces of food and move it towards their mouths. I’d imagine being a sea urchin would be a strange existence.

 

Up to now, this has to be one of the strangest animals that I’ve ever eaten.  You read that right.  They are edible!  In fact, the roe of a sea urchin is a supreme delicacy sought by chefs all over the world.  The hard part is getting past the spines.

You find this delicacy in various cuisines around the world.  Eaten everywhere from Maine to California, they are even served in various pasta sauces in Italy.  But the biggest appetite of sea urchin belongs to the Japanese.  Indeed, it was at a Japanese restaurant that I had my first experience with this strange dish.

 

It tastes like a strange salty version of codfish that seems to melt in your mouth.  It was quite pleasant, and I’d readily eat it again.  However, before you order up a big plate of these little tapas, you might want to try it first. While I enjoyed it, there are many people who do not.  This is one of those experiences where you either love it or hate it.

 

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For more information of the sea urchin check out:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/557549-health-benefits-for-sea-urchin-sushi/

http://healthbenefitsofeating.com/sea-food/health-benefits-of-eating-sea-urchin/128/

http://www.livestrong.com/article/318753-nutritional-facts-of-a-sea-urchin/

 

Setting Quiet: Use of Abstract Photography

 

Setting Quiet is a new piece that I created on a whim.  I’ve made abstract art using a camera before with some success.  Unfortunately, the colors and the focus are often unusable.

 

When a piece does work, it usually falls within the realm of a macro photographic form.  This transpires to where the subject is so closely focused and cropped it becomes abstract in its own right.

 

Consider that abstraction in photography is about presenting an image and having it engineered in such a way as to evoke a viewer’s response without necessarily being able to guess what the subject of the picture was.  Normally, having a close focus or a very narrow aperture accomplishes this using photographic equipment.

 

But that is just part of the story of Setting Quiet, I was curious about what would happen if we dared to open the rule book and go rogue.  So, I generated an image that hyper focuses the subject in the opposite than normal way.  The result is Setting Quiet.

 

In this particular photographic work of art, the colors inspire you to relax.  Relaxation and reflection are the mission behind this photographic work.  It identifies with that time of the day that inspires us to take a step back, ignore our stresses for the day, and experience now.  The blurred lines of the central circle alter your perception of light to dark hues while satisfying any need for recognizable form.

 

While we cherish the brightness of the whites and purples, we slowly descend into a realm of phantasmal blues and darker hues.  A relaxing commentary meant to nurture enjoyment of the day as we spend it.

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