Seaweed and Shells

Texture Makes It Better Art

This time we visit the beach to make art and discuss texture.   It is an obvious yet often overlooked component of art. Is a work of art smooth? Or, does it have a tactile feel to it? Is that tactile feel genuine or an illusion? Complex questions answered when dealing with art works of any size or variety. Actually, texture regularly makes or breaks the uniqueness of a particular work to the viewer.   In photography, good  texture often happens by using by a simple method.

 

An easy method of finding texture to apply in a work of art is to simply find a subject with that interesting texture already present. At first this may seem like an oversimplification. But an artist often looks deeper into physical relationships of their subjects.

 

So finding the right subject to portray what the artist wants to say is usually much more difficult than most people assume. The reason for this is that the eye-catching nature of the texture, as applied to the work of art, is often up to the individual artist. This is where an implied artistic interpretation impacts the story the artist is attempting to tell.  If this seems to be almost metaphysically philosophical in nature, it’s because it is. It is art after all.

Truly, texture becomes a necessary part of the artistic vision used to make any work of art. This selected interpretation develops thru a specific application.  In the painting arts, it often appears as gobs of thick paint. Drawing a certain way, or even the use of different brushes and washes accomplish the desired artistic effect.

 

Seaweed and Shells
Seaweed and Shells

However, in photography, the artist has to apply other means to accomplish this same goal. So often, the photographer looks for the visual aspects of a shot that will provide these needed textures naturally.

Seaweed and Shells

Perhaps the artist is attempting to show the smooth skin of a person to showcase beauty or youth. Or, as in the case of Seaweed and Shells, texture adds a sense of conflict between the gritty sand, the spongy seaweed and the smooth interior of a shell.   When I took this shot, I fell in love with the notion that the rich textures provided a sort of glue that made the picture work.

 

What's on your mind?